The Way of the Brush & the Sword Sacred Fist Karate International Ken To Fude No Ryu Kenshu Kai Karate Solly Said's Solly Said's Karate,Kickboxing & Gym
Ken To Fude No Ryu Kenshu Kai Karate International Karate, Kickboxing & Gym
The Way of the Brush & the Sword Sacred Fist Karate International Embracing the spirit of never quitting

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Ba Fa Quan Ba Gua Zhang Ba Ji Quan Bak Fu Pai Bak Mei Black Crane Kung Fu
Black Tiger Chang Quan Choy Gar Choy Li Fut Chuo Jiao Da Cheng Quan
Di Tang Quan Dim Mak Do Pi Kung Fu Dragon Fist Drunken Monkey Duan Quan
Emei Quan Fanzi Quan Feng Shou Five Ancestors Fist Five Animals Fu Jow Pai
Fujian White Crane Fut Gar Kung Fu Go-Ti Boxing Gou Quan Hong Cha Hou Quan
Hua Quan Hung Fut Hung Gar Hung Sing Jing Quan Do Jiu Fa Men
Lai Tung Pai Lau Gar Leopard Kung Fu Liq Chuan Liu He Luohan Quan
Meihua Quan Mian Quan Mizongyi Nan Quan Northern Eagle Claw Northern Praying Mantis
Pao Chui Pigua Quan Quan Fa San Shou Sansoo Shaolin Kung Fu
Shaolin Nam Pai Chuan Shuai Jiao Snake Kung Fu Southern Praying Mantis Tai Sheng Men Taijiquan
Tai Chi Chuan
Tamo Sho Tan Tui Tang Shou Dao Tien Shan Pai Tiger Kung Fu Tongbei Quan
Wing Chun Wushu Xingyi Quan Yau Kung Moon Zui Quan  
Mian Quan (literally "Cotton Fist") is a northern Chinese martial arts style which most likely originated in the province of Hebei. There is no definite given record of the creator or origin of the style. It gained fame when practiced at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany as one of the main events.
The theory for this style is that defense becomes offense and softness turns to hardness, and the practitioner's attacks always follow after the opponent's. Soft attacks gain the upper hand for a practitioner and sets up the opponent for a harder, more dominant array of movements.

The style is simple to use as it does not require advanced movements such as grappling, therefore only using punches and kicks. Mian Quan requires balanced posture, with the majority of the body relaxed and a short-range attack span.

Movements in Mian Quan are spread but steady. The basic actions of the body, hands and feet are similar to those of Chang Chuan or Long Fist Boxing. The only difference is that a Mian Quan practitioner execute his techniques with a relax body.

In form practice, movements are fully extended but steady, flexible, and continuous. The main characteristic of Mian Quan is to gain an advantage over the enemy by attacking only after the opponent has attacked. It bases its movements mainly on defense and launch attacks only after a defensive moves.

In combat, practitioners of Mian Quan use charging and hard techniques for attacks. Retreating with soft and suppleness techniques is used for defense. Because of its comfortable actions and its practicability, Mian Quan is a popular style of Kung Fu, especially for Wushu practitioners.



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