The Way of the Brush & the Sword Sacred Fist Karate International Ken To Fude No Ryu Kenshu Kai Karate Solly Said's Solly Said's Karate,Kickboxing & Gym
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Ba Fa Quan Ba Gua Zhang Ba Ji Quan Bak Fu Pai Bak Mei Black Crane Kung Fu
Black Tiger Chang Quan Choy Gar Choy Li Fut Chuo Jiao Da Cheng Quan
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Emei Quan Fanzi Quan Feng Shou Five Ancestors Fist Five Animals Fu Jow Pai
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Hua Quan Hung Fut Hung Gar Hung Sing Jing Quan Do Jiu Fa Men
Lai Tung Pai Lau Gar Leopard Kung Fu Liq Chuan Liu He Luohan Quan
Meihua Quan Mian Quan Mizongyi Nan Quan Northern Eagle Claw Northern Praying Mantis
Pao Chui Pigua Quan Quan Fa San Shou Sansoo Shaolin Kung Fu
Shaolin Nam Pai Chuan Shuai Jiao Snake Kung Fu Southern Praying Mantis Tai Sheng Men Taijiquan
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Wing Chun Wushu Xingyi Quan Yau Kung Moon Zui Quan  
According to legend, Hung Ga was named after Hung Hei-Gun, who learned martial arts from Jee Sin, a Chan (Zen) master at the Southern Shaolin Temple. Jee Sin (ak Gee Sum Sim See) was also the master of four other students, namely Choy Gau Lee, Mok Da Si, Lau Sam-Ngan and Li Yao San. These five martial artists later became the founders of the five major family styles of Southern Chinese martial arts: (Hung Ga, Choy Gar, Mok Gar, Li Gar and Lau Gar).

The Hung Gar system incorporates the five elements of Chinese Medicine – fire, earth,metal, water and wood. Each element has a particular characteristic of defense and attack,which has been included within the Hung Gar system. Many other Chinese martial arts styles incorporate these into their systems in a very similar way.

In order to appreciate and understand the elements specifically within the Hung Gar system, it is important first to broadly consider a basic observation and description of them in the context of their characteristics, and how this observation may help condition or prepare the martial artist in developing fighting skills.



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